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Herbs to soothe your child’s chickenpox

By | baby health, children's health, Food & Eating, Health, Uncategorized | No Comments
by Henriette Kress
author of Practical Herbs 1 & 2

Chickenpox (varicella) is caused by the varicella virus. It’s belongs to the herpesviruses. You can remedy all problems caused by this group the same way, including cold sores (herpes simplex) and shingles (herpes zoster).

The most important thing to know about chickenpox is that it can get a lot worse if you use aspirin or ibuprofen. Leave them in your medicine cupboard whenever somebody has chickenpox or herpes.

The second important thing to know is that you have the virus for life. You can get rid of the symptoms, but you can’t get rid of the virus itself. Chickenpox is fairly mild if you get it in childhood. It’s a lot worse if you first get it as an adult, and it’s very contagious. It’s dangerous to the fetus if caught by a pregnant woman.

Herbs for chickenpox
I like three herbs for chickenpox:
1. Lemon balm
Lemon balm (Melissa) has been shown to be effective against various herpes-family viruses. It’s a mild herb and can be given freely as a tea. Here’s how:

Lemon balm tea
1-2 teaspoons dried lemon balm
or 3-4 teaspoons fresh crushed leaves of lemon balm
200 ml boiling water
Pour the water over the herb, let steep for 10 minutes and strain. Let cool until it’s drinkable and let your child drink as much as he likes.

2. Coneflower
Coneflowers (Echinacea-species) are wonderful herbs that help strengthen the immune system. They’re also effective against different viruses in the herpes family. Purple coneflower is widely available as a tincture. To use, dilute the tincture in water and give it to your child:

Diluted coneflower tincture
15 drops coneflower tincture
100 ml water
Mix and let your child sip this throughout the day. Generally, coneflowers work better in acute problems if they’re taken as small doses often rather than as larger doses three times a day.

If you find dried coneflower herb, you can make that into a tea instead. The recipe is:
Coneflower tea
1-2 teaspoons dried coneflower
200 ml boiling water
Pour the water over the herb, let steep for 10 minutes and strain. Let cool until it’s drinkable and let your child drink as much as she likes.

3. St. John’s wort
An infused oil of St. John’s wort works wonders for the itch of chickenpox. It’s also great for the pain from shingles. You can make your own, but you can also buy it in well-stocked health food stores. If you can’t get an oil or salve of St. John’s wort, you can use a calendula salve instead.

Infused oil of St. John’s wort
• Fresh flowering tops of St. John’s wort
• Extra virgin olive oil

Fill a jar with the chopped-up flowering tops, then cover the herb with olive oil. Leave the jar in your oven on 50 ºC for two hours and strain the liquid into a wide-mouth jar. Let the water settle out until the oil is clear instead of murky, for about 5 days. Bottle your oil and add a label: ‘St. John’s wort oil’ plus the date. Store in the fridge.

It’s an excellent oil for bruises, sprains, strains and similar and is very effective for chickenpox and shingles.

4. An oat bath
An oat bath is extremely soothing to the itch from chickenpox. To make it, you’ll need a small or large bathtub and rolled oats:

Anti-itch bath
A handful of finely rolled oats
warm (not hot) water
Draw a bath with warm water and adjust the temperature to suit your child. Lower your child into the water and very gently rub a handful of finely rolled oats over his skin. Older children can to this for themselves, too.

5. Chickweed
Chickweed is among our best herbs for various itches. It’s an abundant weed in lush garden soil. Use scissors to take the top off the chickweed and crush it in a little water. Strain and use the resulting green-tinted liquid as a gentle wash on your child’s itchy spots. Chickweed can also be made into an infused oil (see under St. John’s wort); it’s soothing in that form, too.

Those who have had chickenpox can get another outbreak of the same virus decades later. This time it’s shingles, though. Shingles is usually brought on by stress or by an immune system that’s laid low by some other disease. You can use the same herbs for shingles as you used for chickenpox.

Practical Herbs 1 & 2 by Henriette Kress, are available now, published by AEON Books, priced £19.99 each. For more information see: www.aeonbooks.co.uk

The benefits of yoga for children

By | children's health, fun for children, Health, Mental health, Sport, Uncategorized | No Comments

by Charlie Nash
YogaFrogs

We potentially think of yoga as something for adults, yet yoga has so much to offer everyone beyond the adult learners. It’s no wonder then that a growing number of children and families are opting to participate in yoga classes tailored for children. With many yoga teachers now offering yoga for both children and their families, there’s plenty of opportunity around Sussex to experience this, whether it might be in your local community hall, yoga studio, festival, after-school club or a 1:1 session in the comfort of your own home.

Yoga was developed up to 5,000 years ago in India as a comprehensive system for well-being on all levels; physical, mental, emotional and spiritual. In the West we often focus on the physical aspect of yoga. The other elements, which go hand-in-hand with the physical, are starting to be recognised and shared with students both young and old alike.

These benefits are being recognised by educational authorities across the country with more primary and secondary schools acknowledging the benefits yoga has on their students’ mental and physical health, particularly around SATS and other public exams.

In an age where technology has taken over our lives, the benefits of yoga couldn’t be in greater need. Whether we like it or not, children and adults are bombarded with information overload from television, the Internet and smartphones. It’s said that in the course of a day, the average person in a western city is exposed to as much data as someone in the 15th century would encounter in their entire lifetime.

Yoga allows children to take time out from all of the above. With continued practice there’s a wealth of benefits that can enrich their entire lives all the way through to adulthood. Yoga is not only fun, it encourages children to think freely and let their imaginations go wild, as they explore the many asanas (postures) that link to nature and animals. Children thoroughly enjoy the connections with their bodies, with movement helping to promote self-awareness of their limbs, joints and muscles from a young age. Yoga subtly teaches us about the interconnectedness of our bodies. From toes and jaws, to heart and lungs. This allows us to keep every part of our body alive and supple, no matter how small.

With regular practice children can find deeper concentration, which may have positive effects in both school and family life. This is achieved through the opportunity and encouragement to clear the mind and to focus single-handedly on each asana at a time. Beyond the physical, yoga teaches children to quiet the mind through different relaxation and breathing techniques. This can help with anxiety and stress, being a skill the children can practise anytime and anywhere.

Children learn to be non-competitive and non-judgemental of themselves and others. They learn to share and take turns with other children in the class, promoting kindness and gratitude from a young age. They learn, through yoga, that they are OK just the way they are and don’t need to compare themselves to others. This allows them to become more accepting and understanding of not only themselves, but also everybody else around them.

The Dalai Lama said “If every eight year old in the world is taught meditation, we will eliminate violence from the world within one generation”. With a rapidly expanding and growing world, this quote could not be more relevant. Allowing children to be grounded and centred in their thoughts is one of the greatest gifts we can give. Making sure their true nature is made up of compassion, love, and wisdom, which can then be shared with the world.

YogaFrogs – bringing weekly yoga, mindfulness, meditation and creativity to children, teens and families across East and West Sussex,
www.yogafrogs.co.uk

Brows to wow!

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Browologist and the ‘Go to Brow Artist of 2018’ Samantha Trace shares how Microblading is the biggest secret to youthful looks!

Over the last few years brows have become one of the biggest beauty trends in the UK. The correct shape can frame your face and enhance your best features.

With many of us having over plucked our brows, or lost hair through pregnancy, breastfeeding or medical conditions, we can then find ourselves spending a lot of time every day filling in the patches and trying to get them to look the same as each other.

It was Cara Delevingne’s iconic natural bushy beauties that made us all want to grow our brows. Gone now are the pencil-thin brows that resemble tadpoles and it’s hello to fluffy, feathered brows that look natural and well-groomed.

But it’s hard to grow out your eyebrows as the hairs can grow back patchy and sparse. Luckily there’s an easier way to get those ‘Wow Brows’ with Microblading and Semi Permanent Cosmetics which can help you achieve the most natural and flawless look.

Microblading and Semi-Permanent Cosmetics can instantly take your brows from barely there, to full and beautiful!

Using the most advanced techniques that apply pigment into the skin using a pen like devise and tiny micro needles that replicate the look of real hairs.

The needle can flow in the same direction as the hair, forming a wonderful natural brow. This technique of ‘hair stroke’ is the finest form of eyebrow tattooing. The brows are designed around your natural face shape, bone structure and, most importantly, the way you want them! The correct colour pigment will be chosen to replicate your natural brow hair colour and complement your underlying skin tone. Samantha says that she has never believed in the saying “Brows should be sisters not twins” so by using state of the art technology she can ensure the best symmetry of the brows for the perfect fit to your face shape.

By mimicking realistic hairs this method can create any desired look such as beautifully bold brows, or a light fluffy finish.

Natural beauty is the most beautiful of all, so opting for a procedure like this can offer you a helping hand to get that flawless look all ready for you to jump out of bed for the school run! The added bonus, of course, is not having to worry about smudging your pencilled brows or the brow gel sweating off while you are busy with daily life.

Celebrity mums such as Victoria Beckham, Gwen Stefani and Angelina Jolie all sport natural Microbladed brows which are not only waterproof but also bring your youthful face back to life.

With Microblading and Permanent Cosmetics, two sessions are needed around four to eight weeks apart. This is because it is not as deep as a regular tattoo and may take two sessions for the body to hold the pigment.

The good news is that a topical numbing cream is applied to make the procedure less uncomfortable so you can lie back and dream about having that extra 15 minutes in the morning not having to apply eye brow pencil! The effects can last 12 to 24 months with annual colour boosts recommended.

Microblading with Samantha costs £350 for both treatments and the aftercare kit containing products for the best-healed results.
Samantha also offers free consultations to help give you an idea of what your brows can look like.
www.samanthatracecosmetics.com

What you need to know before considering mediation

By | Education, family, Finance, Legal, Relationships, Uncategorized | No Comments
by Sarah Brookes
Brookes Family Mediation

The mediator will not tell you what to do or make any decisions for you
The mediator’s role is to support you both towards reaching joint decisions, on the issues that you each identify as needing resolution. Whilst the mediator will help you to reality test any proposed agreements; to ensure that they will work as intended, in meeting and protecting each of your needs; they will not seek to influence the final decisions that you make. You will be supported to jointly take responsibility for the shape of your future. This approach reduces conflict and minimises the need to compete; unfortunately, the exact opposite is true of court proceedings. It is for this reason that mediated arrangements have proved less likely to break down than court ordered arrangements.

Mediation is more likely to be successful if you keep an open mind
Whilst it is helpful to give some thought to what you would like to achieve through mediation; you will also need to be able to consider ideas and proposals put forward by the other person. This approach enables all options to be explored, in order to find the best solutions for you both. Agreement is usually reached quickest when both people feel that they have been fully and equally involved and listened to within the process.

A mediator does not make moral judgements
Mediation is not about raking over the past to decide who was right and who was wrong. It is about dealing with the here and now, and the practical arrangements and decisions that need to be made, to enable you both to move forward in the best way possible. The mediator will remain impartial and committed to helping you both equally, throughout the process. Emotional outbursts are fairly common within mediation, and will not affect the mediator’s ability to remain entirely impartial.

A mediator is not a passive observer
The mediator will take an active part in your discussions, and whilst they will not give advice, they will often make suggestions, flag up points that have not been considered, and give relevant information. Where necessary, the mediator will also refocus the conversations, to ensure that they are constructive and moving forward towards solutions and agreements.

Where there has been domestic abuse, mediation may still be
the best option
It is the mediator’s duty to provide a safe environment where you are able to freely express your views, without fear of harm. If you do have concerns relating to your safety, the mediator will be able to asses and advise as to whether or not mediation is appropriate in your circumstances. If you don’t feel able to sit in the same room as your former partner, mediation can take place on a ‘shuttle’ basis, which is where you will sit in separate rooms, with the mediator moving between you. The mediator will usually also arrange staggered arrival and departure times. There is even the possibility of mediation taking place through Skype, so that you do not have to be in the same building.

Sarah Brookes spent 16 years working as a family lawyer in Eastbourne, before setting up Brookes Family Mediation. Sarah is passionate about the benefits of mediation. If you are uncertain about whether mediation is right for you, or if you have any questions, give Sarah a call on: 01323 411629 or email her: sarah@brookesfamilymediation.co.uk
Or for more information go to: www.brookesfamilymediation.co.uk

Quick and healthy family meals for busy parents

By | children's health, Food & Eating, fun for children, Health, Uncategorized | No Comments

by Jess Crocker
Manager, Brighton & Hove Food Partnership

We’ve all been there – after a long day, staring into the fridge willing a decent meal to appear as a tired child moans in our ear. We want to serve up healthy meals our children love, but this ideal can seem far away at times. At the Food Partnership we’ve been teaching adults and families about cookery and nutrition for over 10 years so we’ve seen these same issues again and again. So many of our strongest happy memories are connected to food, so we want to see more families finding simple ways to have positive experiences together in the kitchen and at the dining table.

Here’s our top time-saving tips to make healthy meals easier:
• Hidden veg tomato sauce Lots of parents blend or chop vegetables into pasta sauce to up their children’s veg intake, but we love to find new ways to make this go even further – freeze a large batch of the sauce so you can use it on pita-bread pizzas (see below), in stews, shepherd’s pie and or even as a base for a minestrone soup.

• Do it together
Getting children involved in cooking is a great way to get them trying new foods. Many parents involve even young children in activities like baking but the time, sugar and mess means this isn’t really an everyday option. We often find family meals that give children choice and control help to improve eating habits – and this can be quick too. One of our favourites is pita bread pizzas – all you need are store-bought breads, tomato paste or a basic sauce, grated cheese and some toppings (think frozen sweetcorn, peppers, chopped fresh tomato). Even toddlers can assemble the pizza themselves and wait excitedly to try their creation.

• Don’t fear frozen
Frozen veg often retains more nutrients than fresh food which has been left to languish in the fridge, plus you can portion out exactly what you need and cook it quickly. Keep a range of veg (and fruit) in the freezer to ensure your children get a good variety of foods without spending a fortune. Toddlers who are teething may even enjoy eating frozen peas or sweetcorn, and a little bit of frozen spinach can disperse through a dish as a very gentle introduction to more bitter flavours. It can take up to fifteen times for children to accept a new food, so don’t worry if it takes a while, if you’re eating it yourself they should eventually follow suit.

• Protein power
People often focus on vegetable intake in children – don’t forget protein. Children need two portions per day, roughly the size of their own fist or a handful. As well as meat, eggs and fish, we find that red lentils cook quickly and can easily disappear into a tasty carrot soup or casserole to add extra nutrition easily.

Check out our website for lots of quick and easy family recipes. If you have a top tip or recipe that helps your family eat quickly and well, we’d love to hear from you.

Local non-profit organisation, the Food Partnership has just launched a new ‘Community Kitchen’ on Queens Road in central Brighton – a cookery school where classes with chefs and food experts help subsidise low-cost, accessible community cookery activities.
www.bhfood.org.uk/the-community-kitchen

Slime time!

By | Education, fun for children, Mental health, Uncategorized | No Comments
by Sharon Me
Creator and Director of Artpod Ltd

Are your children obsessed with Slime? Have they taken over the kitchen with home-made recipes from YouTube, only for you to hear the cries of it didn’t work! Like all good recipes and experiments the devil is in the detail and with a few kitchen ingredients you can have some great fun with your children.

There are several different ways to make Slime, and you can, of course, experiment with using different ingredient sand different amounts to produce varying textures, colours and consistencies.

Here is my favourite Slime to make at home – corn flour Slime also known as Oobleck. This recipe is brilliant for all ages and abilities and is the easiest to make and play with.

Ingredients:
• 1 cup of corn flour
• Up to a quarter cup of water
• Plastic sheet to keep your kitchen table free of mess!

Instructions:
Mix the ingredients together adding a small amount of water at a time in a bowl and you’re done! Yes, that’s it! The more water you add the more dribbles you will get and the more corn flour, the thicker the Slime.

This Slime is, in fact, a non newtonian fluid, which means it simply cannot make up its mind as to whether it is a liquid or a solid! A good way to explain this is by showing how different forces work.

Ask your children to try and pick up the Slime in a ball and they will find it is quite tricky to pick up and that it runs through their fingers.

Next, ask them to pick some Slime up and quickly roll it into a ball in their hands really, really fast. The motion and force of the movement will keep it in a ball until they stop rolling, at which point it will trickle through your fingers again. All very messy but great fun!

Experiment with making more Slime by increasing the quantities and your little scientists could even try walking on Oobleck! This time, make the Slime in a large washing up bowl so that it is ankle deep. Use at least two packets of 400g corn flour, add water and mix to the same consistency as before.

Then ask your little scientists to try the following experiment.

Take their shoes
and socks off, roll up trousers or skirts and then challenge them to jump up and down on the Oobleck and see what happens.

It is a good idea to hold their hands at this point as they can get very excited (also put some old towels down in advance to soak up the splashes!)

Your little scientist will find that the force of jumping up and down causes the Slime to become temporarily solid – however, the second they stop jumping they will start to slowly sink into the Oobleck, which usually creates giggles galore!

To escape from the Oobleck, lift one foot up at a time and let the Slime dribble into the bowl before stepping on to the towel and then repeat with the second foot. Again, hold their hands to help them keep their balance.

Glow-in-the-dark Oobleck
If you want to take the science a bit further you may want to try to make glow-in-the-dark Slime – all you need is cheap indian tonic water to replace the regular water in exactly the
same quantities.

Tonic water will fluoresce under ultraviolet light, owing to the presence of quinine. In fact, the sensitivity of quinine to ultraviolet light is such that it will appear visibly fluorescent
in direct sunlight. You can also try making a mini darkroom with a regular pop up tent and a small black light torch or UV torch. This will make your Slime really glow!

Cleaning up afterwards
Remove any large quantities of Slime and put it in the bin.
Any additional splashes on clothes or carpets are best left to dry as the corn flour dries back into a powder and can then be vacuumed up. Then wipe over the surface with cold soapy water.

Sharon Mee is Creator and Director of Artpod Ltd who design and deliver parties, workshops and events for all ages and abilities. Creativity and fun are at the heart of what we do!
We believe in the power of the imagination and experimentation and that through the process of creating something, magical things can happen!

There’s a puncture out there with your name on it!

By | family, Health, Safety, Uncategorized, Winter | No Comments

So said the marketing campaign from Bridgestone at the launch of DriveGuard, their “game changing tyre innovation, which places safety and convenience in every driver’s seat. ”Contentious comment? Yes! Good solution for safer family driving? Read on and find out what we thought…

On average, every driver can expect to have six punctures in their lifetime and 27% of all roadside emergencies are tyre related. And don’t forget, a flat is not just an inconvenience. If a puncture happens rapidly, you have less control, less braking capability and are more susceptible to the prevailing road conditions. If it happens slowly, you may not even be aware you have a puncture for some time. That can affect your fuel consumption, road handling and even braking distances, particularly in wet or icy conditions. That is why all cars made after November 2014 are now required by law to have a Tyre Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) built in. There are a variety of systems from the various car manufacturers as well as third party products that can be retro-fi tted to older vehicles, but fundamentally the TPMS alerts the driver that tyre pressure is low and that there may be a problem with one or more of your tyres. Over time, all tyres will lose pressure, including your often forgotten spare, so regularly check and top up your pressures as per your car manufacturers recommended levels. Whether you’re on the school run, driving to work, going home or meeting with friends – there’s never a convenient time for a puncture. In fact, in 23% of cases, punctures happen during the evening or late at night which adds additional stress and anxiety to the situation. Of these, more than 50% happen in inconvenient locations and no driver wants to fi nd themselves stranded, changing their tyre on the side of a busy road, in the dirt, in the rain, in the dark. Particularly if you’ve a young family on board. It’s perhaps no surprise that 72% of women and 33% of men don’t change their own tyre. However, if there’s no cellphone reception to call for assistance – you’re on your own!Where is the spare? Has it any air in it? Is it under all the luggage? Where are the locknut keys? Where is the jack? No wheel spanner! Is that skinny temporary thing really the spare? You fill it with what!?
With over 60% of drivers experiencing a puncture in the last four years – leading to feelings of helplessness and insecurity combined with lost time of up to three hours – the Bridgestone team have comeup with a very, very good answer to the problem. DriveGuard can, in practically all conditions, help prevent accidents resulting from punctures, sudden loss of pressure or other types of tyre damage. It provides a safe and reliable solution, allowing drivers to wipe their hands clean of inconvenient puncture scenarios.So how does it work?
At the moment of puncture, you still have complete control over the vehicle and are made aware of the problem by your PTMS on the dash. You can continue to move with the traffic without immediately having to pull over or risk driving on and shredding the tyre. A flat tyre leads to rubber deformation which generates heat or friction; by using a special patented compound, Bridgestone has created a high-tech cooling fi n design in the sidewall that channels the increased heat from the sidewall towards the rim and thus helps to preserve the tyre.Based on state of the art technology, DriveGuard’s sophisticated tread pattern helps evacuate water to resist hydroplaning, while engineered sipes increase the number of biting edges to enhance wet road traction. As a result, Bridgestone DriveGuard has achieved the highest rating in wet grip performance (EU Tyre Label: A grade) with short braking distances, while offering a level of comfort comparable to conventional tyres, placing it at the frontline of road safety.The new age DriveGuard technology uses a proprietary high-tech cooling fin design as well as supportive and tough reinforced sidewalls which allow drivers to maintain control and continue driving safely and comfortably for 80km at up to 80kmph (50 miles at 50mph) after a puncture; fast enough and long enough to arrive safely at their desired destination or to seek assistance at a convenient service point.We drove a standard saloon car, with a deliberately punctured tyre for over 10km, and it handled just like a normal car. In fact, one of the other review teams managed to have a SECOND puncture during testing, and drove trouble free with both front tyres blown!“Bridgestone DriveGuard empowers you to keep moving and avoid the immediate burden and unsafe circumstances of a fl at tyre; drivers get to choose when and where they have their tyre replaced – within the indicated speed and distance limits. Our revolutionary new technology will considerably contribute to road safety and give drivers additional peace of mind and convenience while on the road,” said Eduardo Minardi, Executive Chairman of Bridgestone EMEA. Bridgestone DriveGuard eliminates the need to carry a spare tyre and is environmentally conscious due to being fully recyclable. That means less weight so less fuel and 20% fewer tyres required per car so less material required.Despite the impressive safety benefi ts and convenience advantages, a full set is only marginally more expensive than any other premium tyres of the same size. Your vehicle will be safer, lighter and have more space on board.So, in our opinion Driveguard offers a major contribution to road safety and all family cars should have them fi tted whenever practically possible!
www.bridgestone.co.uk
www.facebook.com/Bridgestone.EU
www.twitter.com/bridgestonetyre
www.linkedin.com/company/bridgestone-europe

 

Pregnancy myths

By | baby health, prenancy, Uncategorized | No Comments

Pregnancy is an exciting time for expectant parents but it can also be a daunting minefield of conflicting professional and personal opinions. As bump grows, mums and dads and grannies and grandpa’s (not to mention colleagues, neighbours and strangers at bus stops) impart their wisdom, asked for or otherwise, and often it is at odds with the midwife’s official guidance.
Spatone natural liquid iron supplement looks at some of these “In my day…” gems of advice to see if any of them still hold true.

Myth 1: How you are ‘carrying’ the baby can tell you the sex.

Nothing could be further from the truth. The shape and height of your bump is determined by your muscle tone, uterine tone, and the position the baby is in, not by the sex. The only way to know is via an ultrasound scan or amniocentesis and even then it is not always possible to be completely sure.

Myth 2: You shouldn’t drink coffee while pregnant.

You don’t need to give up caffeine entirely, the current advice for is to limit yourself to (ACOG 2010, FSA 2008, Jahanfar and Jaafar 2013) 200mg of caffeine a day – this equates to drinking approximately two mugs of tea, two mugs of instant coffee or one mug of filer coffee a day. If your habit exceeds these amounts try a
de-caf version in the afternoons, it may help you sleep better too!
 
Myth 3: Heartburn means baby has lots of hair.

Heartburn is a common discomfort during pregnancy because your stomach is pushed higher by the growing baby. It is no way an accurate predictor of baby being born with a full head of hair. Lots of women who experience heartburn give birth to bald babies!

Myth 4: You shouldn’t eat smoked salmon when pregnant.

Pregnant women can eat smoked fish and are not advised to avoid it currently. Fish is good for mothers-to-be because it is a good source of many vitamins and minerals, as well as essential omega-3 fatty acids like DHA. There are some types of fish you should limit to two portions a week, this includes oily fish like salmon. There are also fish you should completely avoid like swordfish. The NHS website provides a full list.

Myth 5: You are eating for two.

In the first six months of pregnancy our energy needs do not increase. The average woman of normal weight pre-pregnancy only needs about 200 extra calories per day in her third trimester to promote her baby’s growth. That’s roughly the number of calories in a piece of buttered toast and a banana. Gaining too much weight can result in gestational diabetes and a struggle to lose the weight
post birth so think twice
before eating a double helping of dessert!

Myth 6: Lying or sleeping on your back will hurt the baby.

While you won’t harm your baby if you lie on your back for short periods of time, lying on your back after 16 weeks can be uncomfortable. After 16 weeks it can make you feel faint as the baby presses on major blood vessels. Sleeping on your side might be more comfortable and as your bump gets heavier you might find it better to prop yourself up with pillows so you are almost sitting.

Myth 7: Guinness is a good source of iron.

Mums and nans are forever telling us about the daily dose of stout they consumed during pregnancy because it is a good source of iron and a lot of people still believe this old wives tale. In fact Guinness and similar stouts contains no more iron than standard beer and you would need to drink a whopping 35 pints to get your daily intake of iron. But more importantly, pregnant women should avoid alcohol altogether as not only does it carry an increased risk of miscarriage but may be harmful for the unborn baby.

Lessons for life

By | Education, Uncategorized | No Comments
by Richard Taylor-West
Headmaster, Shoreham College

A few years ago, standing at the back of an assembly hall I heard a former pupil, who was setting up at the time to make a presentation to our pupils, say “Wow, I thought we just did English and maths at school but now I see that we learnt a lot more. And I thought I had learned most of that myself.” This is a true story.

He was commenting on an assembly that had just delivered a package to about 90 pupils of what we in schools call PSHE and its broader cousin SMSC. In other words, Personal Social and Health Education and Spiritual Moral Social and Cultural education.

As a parent, you probably know a bit about PSHE, or have at least heard about it. Your children may have even come home and told you about it. They might have said something along the lines of: “Well, we did this stuff today about eating the right fruit, or whatever…” They might have said: “We looked at managing hazards and risk.” They might have said something more dramatic: “Yeah, we did drugs at school today.” This would have grabbed your attention slightly more, especially if phrased that way. Sessions in SMSC might be described differently:
“Well, we talked today about what is most important to us. Stuff about values.”

There was a time, which I remember as a young teacher, when teaching staff could be overtly cynical about this material. Perhaps I was too, once upon a time. They felt it was just a bolt-on to the real lessons, so to speak. It’s not always easy to get pupils to engage in it either – but then teaching never was straightforward.

Attitudes in schools to this kind of work have changed very positively in recent years and we think that is right. The government, and Justine Greening in particular, is beginning to take this material very seriously too, particularly in the areas of the challenges of the online world, digital safety and the complexities of positive relationships between young people. We are currently getting advice from one of the country’s leading LGBT associations, Allsorts Youth Project, in how we might be able to support all of our young people.

There has been talk that PSHE will become compulsory in schools in the next few years and, as far as our school is concerned, they will be pushing at an open door. We do strongly feel that PSHE and SMSC both generate lessons and materials for the pupils that are superb lessons for life. Our pupils, for instance, learn about budgeting: what is a loan, what are percentage rates, and what is an overdraft? Are short-term loans at 1259% a good idea? I will leave that rhetorically hanging. What does it in fact cost to run a house in Brighton and Hove? An eye opener for some! (And might enable them to appreciate their parents a little more.)

We run sessions from one end of a spectrum to another. We have tutorials on table etiquette (rather quaint you might say) but then again we have programmes that look at the dangerous and corrosive nature of peer pressure and gangs.

One thing you can certainly say is that PSHE and SMSC provide material that is rarely dull. Though the pupils will sometimes say that when asked what they have done at school. ‘Nuffin,’ is what you may hear. I would not believe that, if I were you. In most schools they are doing far from nothing and they are doing all that they can to counter the kind of junk they might be learning online!

There are parents who will perhaps be concerned that we spend too much time in schools looking at this kind of stuff. After all, what’s it got to do with their GCSEs and A-levels? Well quite a lot actually, much research says. According to the PSHE Association, which is currently working closely with the government, it is as clear as this: “We have gathered a wealth of evidence demonstrating that the knowledge, skills and attributes taught within PSHE education have a positive impact in a number of areas, including emotional well-being, academic attainment and preparation for the world of work.”
www.pshe-association.org.uk/what-we-do/evidence-and-research

Sitting at a conference recently, I heard quite a surprising claim: one of the world’s largest online companies no longer looks for ‘straight-A pupils’ any more. What they look for are young people who have strong core values, resilience, are good at relationships, are adaptable and who have a wider sense of the world in which they live. This makes sense to us here and we are committed to delivering the best lessons for life that we can through our PSHE and SMSC programmes to all of our age groups. (We try to get the best grades for them too, of course.)

One of the most frightening things that I was reminded of at the same conference was the famous axiom that the concentration camps built by the Nazis were constructed by the finest engineers in the world. Their maths and physics were superb – but what value systems were they taught? Did they have lessons that countered prejudice and racism? Obviously not. Quite the opposite. Suddenly, PSHE looks more relevant than ever to me.

At our school, our pupils have a range of teaching days and timetabled sessions across juniors and seniors given over to PSHE and it is, along with SMSC, interwoven with form time and assemblies. We aim to cover a wide range of topics including Fundamental British Values – an understanding of democracy and compassion for others, for example – but we also give the pupils access to careers information and ways of considering themselves and their place in the world in terms of relationships. We also have a Leadership and Skills programme that challenges them to learn to face challenges – outdoor expeditions, for example – that take them outside of their comfort zones. We are certainly doing what we can to give them the best possible lessons for life.

Please call 01273 592681 to find out more about what Shoreham College can offer you, or to arrange a personal visit at any time of the school year.
www.shorehamcollege.co.uk

Five favourite toys for under fives

By | family, fun for children, Toys, Uncategorized | No Comments
by Kerin McDonald
Fennies Day Nurseries Ltd

Our five favourite toys for under fives come from a form of play that we use in everyday life at Fennies Nurseries called ‘Loose Parts Theory.’ It is not a newly invented form of play nor are the ‘must have toys’ anything new, but they are all magical and treasured by children and therefore loved by us and by parents. The ‘toys’ don’t have instructions and can be played with on their own or in combination. Better still, they inspire creativity and inventiveness and can be found all around us, in nature and around the home.

1. A stick
What is it about little boys and sticks, or little girls and sticks for that matter? The stick is our number one for good reason. Sticks can become anything from swords to pirate flags to wands, pens and markers. They can be used in high action adventures or to build dens or they can be used for drawing in the dirt or sand, or to practise writing and numbers. A stick can be a boat or a raft and raced under bridges or they can be bridges themselves. Children play with sticks on their own or combine them with other sticks or toys (or with other children). Sticks can be any shape, size and colour and are also super in a great big pile of sticks. Bigger seems to be better although there are no limits to the size of a stick, (other than what can be held, at which point a stick becomes a log.) We have an assortment of smaller sticks adorning our nursery hallways and these are regularly updated for newer and ‘better’ sticks. Best yet, sticks are cost-effective toys and, in this case, they do actually grow on trees.

2. A box
A toy nearly as versatile and valuable as a stick. Boxes come in many different sizes, shapes and colours and can be used indoors and outdoors. Boxes transform into ships, cars, trains or any mode of transport. A box can be a chair, a den or a cave. If a large box is squished on one side it becomes a slide. Boxes can be used on their own or combined to become building blocks, treasure chests or beds and they can become houses and resting places for teddies or dolls. It is no surprise that more often than not, new expensive toys are discarded in favour of the box and wrapping they came in. Boxes come in all shapes and sizes, very large and very small boxes are favoured and boxes with lids stimulate even more imaginative play. You might have to buy something to get a box or you can get boxes free of charge from supermarkets or shops.

3. A cardboard tube
Hours of fun once the paper towels, toilet roll or wrapping paper are used. A cardboard tube brings delight and wonder to children of all ages but especially those under five. Tubes come in a variety of sizes and children adapt their use accordingly. A cardboard tube is most commonly transformed into a telescope or a megaphone, however, it can be as versatile as a stick. Cardboard tubes are not as robust as sticks but they are a more practical choice if being used indoors. Tubes can become tunnels, funnels or slides for other toys. Cardboard tubes are not free, however, you will find that many items around the home have a cardboard tube inside them and once they have been played with over and over and over, a cardboard tube can be recycled.

4. Water
We are not sure if water can really be classified as a toy as it needs a receptacle, however, it is marvellous to play with. Ironically, children don’t always love being in water but they do adore playing with water. Water, requires close supervision but there doesn’t need to be a large amount to excite or inspire. Water can be swished, swirled, splashed, bubbled, spilt or poured. It is a wonderful texture and makes great sounds and movements. Water can also be magically transformed into ice or snow which has infinite possibilities for never ending play.

5. Dirt
Finally, a controversial toy or play thing, yet one with endless play opportunities and with probably the highest success rate with children under five. Dirt is fun and children absolutely love to get messy. Dirt can be dug, spread, piled, heaped and used in all manner of ways that only children understand. Dirt can be found in many different places and if you add water, dirt gets even more exciting as it miraculously changes into mud! Although children love to bring dirt inside, it is really an outside toy especially when combined with other toys or water. Dirt is by its very nature, dirty, but it is easily washed away and it is worth the clean-up for such a wonderful toy.

Kerin McDonald is a mummy of two boys under five and is Head of Marketing for Fennies Day Nurseries Ltd, a group  of ten, family run nurseries across Surrey and South London.
Established 25 years ago, Fennies offers wonderful childcare and learning for children aged three months to five years. www.fennies.com