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children’s health

Make time for teeth…

By | children's health, Health | No Comments
by Lisa Costigan
Rottingdean Dental Care

Lisa Costigan from Rottingdean Dental Care has practiced locally for 27 years. During this time she has dealt with many dental injuries and is very keen that all parents should know what to do if their child damages a tooth.

 

What should I do if my child damages a primary (baby) tooth?
You don’t have to do anything yourself to the tooth. However it is important that you visit your dentist as soon as possible. NEVER put back a knocked out primary (baby) tooth as you could damage the permanent tooth below.

Why is important that I visit the dentist straight away?
Your dentist will want to assess the injury and monitor the tooth. If it has become very loose they may want to remove it as there could be an airway risk. If it has been mildly displaced from the socket they may be able to reposition it. Sometimes if the movement is very slight the tooth will reposition spontaneously.

How can I care for the injured tooth at home?
Avoid giving hard food for two to four weeks and if possible avoid use of a pacifier or nursing bottle. Remember to keep brushing the tooth as it is important to keep it clean. Look out for any changes around the injured tooth. Colour change is a common sign of primary (baby) tooth trauma and may range from yellow to grey to black. Always return to your dentist with any concerns.

Can an injury to a primary (baby) tooth damage the unerupted permanent tooth?
During the first years of life the primary (baby) teeth are very closely related to the permanent teeth which are forming inside the bone. When injury occurs in the primary teeth in this period it can affect the appearance of the permanent teeth, which could erupt with white or brown marks or a deformation in the crown. It may also disturb the eruption time of the permanent tooth.

What should I do if a permanent tooth is broken or knocked out?
• Find the tooth. Hold the tooth by the crown (the white part), not by the root (the yellow part).
• Re-implant immediately if possible.
• If contaminated rinse briefly with cold tap water (do not scrub) and put the tooth back in place. This can be done by the child or an adult.
• Hold the tooth in place. Bite on a handkerchief to hold it in position and go to the dentist immediately.
• If you cannot put the tooth back in, place in a cup of milk or saline. When milk or saline or not available, place the tooth in the child’s mouth (between the cheeks and gums).
• Seek immediate dental treatment as your dentist will need to take an x-ray and place a splint on the adjacent teeth. Follow up treatment will depend on the stage of root development of the tooth.

Lisa advises that due to the frequency of the tooth injuries all parents should download the Dental Trauma First Aid App which is endorsed by IAPT (International Association of Dental Traumatology).

Rottingdean Dental Care was opened in 1982. It became the first practice in Sussex to hold both national quality standards BDA Good Practice and Investors in People.
Email: info@rottingdeandental.co.uk

 

Summer safety

By | baby health, children's health, Health, Uncategorized | No Comments

Water fascinates young children and it can be a source of great fun and exercise but sadly each year we hear of children drowning at home and abroad.

Even the most caring of parents can become distracted and it only takes three minutes to drown face-down in water, so even if your children are only playing in a paddling pool or if you have a garden with a pond, always supervise them, and if you need to nip inside to answer the door or go to the toilet, take them with you.

The opportunity to swim in the sea or pool is one of the highlights of going on holiday with children, but before you go do check whether the pool has a lifeguard and once there make sure you understand local water safety signs. If you are going to the beach, it is worthwhile asking the hotel reception or tourist information officer which beach offers the safest place to swim. When you first get to a new pool, take a few minutes to check which end is the deep end and to find out if it has a life guard or pool attendant, as their duties differ.

Although children need constant supervision near water, they will be safer if they can swim and know how to get themselves out of difficulty, so book your child into swimming lessons as soon as you can.

The other danger in the summer comes from the sun. Exposing your child to too much sun may increase their risk of skin cancer later in life and in the short term sunburn can cause considerable pain and discomfort.

Tips to keep you child safe in the sun
• Encourage your child to play in the shade – for example, under trees – especially between 11am and 3pm, when the sun is at its strongest.
• Keep babies under the age of six months out of direct sunlight, especially around midday.
• Cover exposed parts of your child’s skin with sunscreen, even on cloudy or overcast days. Use one that has a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or above and is effective against UVA and UVB. Don’t forget to apply it to their shoulders, nose, ears, cheeks, and the tops of their feet. Reapply often throughout the day.
• Be especially careful to protect your child’s shoulders and the back of their neck when they’re playing, as these are the most common areas for sunburn.
• Cover your child up in loose cotton clothes, such as an oversized T-shirt with sleeves.
• Get your child to wear a floppy hat with a wide brim that shades their face and neck.
• Protect your child’s eyes with sunglasses that meet the British Standard (BSEN 1836:2005) and carry the ‘CE’ mark – check the label.
• If your child is swimming,
use a waterproof sunblock of factor 15 or above. Reapply
after towelling.

Information taken from www.nhs.uk